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    Equine Acupressure: A Working Manual

    Posted on February 22, 2011, under Veterinary Book

    Equine Acupressure: A Working Manual
    This user-friendly guide to acupressure is filled with easy to follow photographs, charts and illustrations. The acupressure meridian system, acupoints and treatment plans are explained in detail along with complete charts showing the location of the points. Acupresure is a safe, noninvasive and powerful way to participate in your horse’s optimal health. This book inlcudes the basics of equine acupressure, plus 15 specific treatments for common equine physical and training conditions.

    • ISBN13: 9780964598232
    • Condition: New
    • Notes: BRAND NEW FROM PUBLISHER! BUY WITH CONFIDENCE, Over one million books sold! 98% Positive feedback. Compare our books, prices and service to the competition. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed


    Clipping a Dog’s Broken Toenail

    Posted on November 18, 2008, under Tutorial

    Dogs’ toenails will often break on their own, learn what to do when your dog has a broken toenail, in this free pet health care video with tips from a veterinarian.

    It’s not uncommon for a dog to break a toenail. It most often occurs when you trim his nails with clippers, but accidents can cause the toenail to break as well. Since the toenail is likely to bleed a lot, you need to take action right away.

    • Stop the bleeding. A dog’s nail is going to bleed a lot when it’s broken. Simply holding a bandage over it usually won’t make it stop. Instead, use a coagulant to pack the wound. Substances that can be used include flour, powder, cornstarch or a styptic powder.
    • Get an over the counter antibiotic cream to place over the broken nail. A generous amount should be applied in order to prevent infection and promote healing.
    • Put a bandage over the area. You can secure the bandage using vet or surgical tape. The area should not be wrapped too tightly and cut off circulation.
    • Cover the bandage with a sock. The sock is used to protect the area and keep the dog from trying to get at the wound. Since the sock is not likely to stay in place on its own, you may have to use more vet tape.
    • Keep a close eye on the dog for the next few days. If the nail does not seem to heal or the dog starts limping, you should make an appointment with the vet.
    • In order to prevent future broken nails, you should learn about how to properly cut a dog’s nails. A vet can let you know how to do it, or you can read a dog care handbook.
    • If your dog is in pain from the broken toenail, you’ll need to have someone hold him or use a muzzle during treatment.

    Tips by eHow.com


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    Dog Anal Sac Disorders

    Posted on July 29, 2008, under Tutorial

    Dog anal sac disorders Dog Anal Sac Disorders may be caused by androgen stimulation since they occur predominantly in males. Combined androgenic and estrogenic influences may be involved because when they do occur in females, spayed females are more commonly affected than sexually intact females. The others predisposing factors include chronically soft feces, recent diarrhea, excessive glandular secretions, and poor muscle tone; retained secretions may lead to infection and abscessation; small breed dogs, including miniature poodles, toy poodles, and chihuahuas are reportedly predisposed to anal sac carcinoma.

    How to diagnose anal sac disorders?
    The history and examination of the anal sacs by digital palpation will establish the diagnosis. If easily palpated through the skin, they are considered enlarged. On expression, normal anal sacs fluid is clear or pale yellow-brown. Thick, pasty brown secretion is characteristic of impaction, and creamy yellow or thin green-yellow secretion is often seen in animals with anal sacculitis.

    Suggested books to read about dog anal sac disorders: Dog Owner’s Home Veterinary Handbook, The First Aid Companion for Dogs & Cats, A Pet Owner’s Guide to 150 Symptoms – and What to Do about Them.

    image source: answer.com


    A Day in the Life of a Veterinarian (First Facts)

    Posted on February 22, 2011, under Veterinary Book

    A Day in the Life of a Veterinarian (First Facts)
    Children will explore a typical day of a community worker, following a firefighter as he puts out a fire, a construction worker on a buidling site, and more! Bright, bold photographs show these helpers serve their communities.

    • ISBN13: 9780736822879
    • Condition: New
    • Notes: BRAND NEW FROM PUBLISHER! BUY WITH CONFIDENCE, Over one million books sold! 98% Positive feedback. Compare our books, prices and service to the competition. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

    Animal Behavior: Mechanisms, Ecology, and Evolution
    The experienced author team of Drickamer, Vessey, and Meikle has created a unique balance in the new edition of Animal Behavior by clearly describing the necessary elements of mechanisms, ecology, and evolution that support a comprehensive study of behavior. This one-semester text is designed for your upper- level course and features chapter coverage that has been completely reorganized to promote a more logical framework for study.